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    Organization

    Boston Classical Orchestra

    Post Office Box 152
    Newton , MA 02468
    617-461-7254

    Website: bostonclassicalorchestra.org


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    BOSTON CLASSICAL ORCHESTRA

    Boston Classical Orchestra delivers outstanding performances of classical repertoire and provides an intimate audience experience, inspiring and entertaining Boston concertgoers and the community at large in our historic Faneuil Hall setting.

    The Boston Classical Orchestra, Inc. is a 501(c) 3 tax-exempt, non-profit registered organization under the U.S. Internal Revenue...

    BOSTON CLASSICAL ORCHESTRA

    Boston Classical Orchestra delivers outstanding performances of classical repertoire and provides an intimate audience experience, inspiring and entertaining Boston concertgoers and the community at large in our historic Faneuil Hall setting.

    The Boston Classical Orchestra, Inc. is a 501(c) 3 tax-exempt, non-profit registered organization under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code.
     

    Our History

    Founded by violinist and long-time BCO concertmaster Robert Brink, the orchestra gave its inaugural performance at historic Faneuil Hall in May, 1980 with the BCO’s first Music Director, F. John Adams, conducting. The orchestra has been performing in this remarkable auditorium ever since. In 1983 Harry Ellis Dickson became Music Director. During his 16-year tenure the orchestra’s offerings tripled, many world-class solo artists were engaged and a program of in-school youth concerts was inaugurated. In 1999 when Steven Lipsitt was named Music Director, Dickson became Music Director Laureate (a post he held until his death in March, 2003).

    Boston Classical Orchestra is a fully professional chamber orchestra focused primarily on music of the Classical period. The Orchestra performs five programs each season on Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons. Each program is carefully crafted to encompass a broad spectrum of classical music appropriate for a chamber orchestra. Depending on the programming, the orchestra can range from 21 to 45 players. One of the most popular programs of the season is the annual Valentine’s concert, which, given the intimate nature of that celebration, can feature still smaller ensembles. A lecture about the music precedes both Saturday and Sunday concerts, and the conductor offers brief spoken commentary about the music and musicians during the concerts.
     


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    Media Reviews


    • Event Name: Irina Muresanu plays Mendelssohn
      Article: At Faneuil Hall, music by the siblings Mendelssohn
      The Boston Globe - Apr 24, 2012
      By Jeremy Eichler

      Under Steven Lipsitt’s direction, Boston Classical Orchestra performed Fanny Mendelssohn’s sole orchestral work — an Overture in C major — at Faneuil Hall on Saturday night as part of a program of music by the siblings Mendelssohn. Soloist Irina Mure… Expand

      Under Steven Lipsitt’s direction, Boston Classical Orchestra performed Fanny Mendelssohn’s sole orchestral work — an Overture in C major — at Faneuil Hall on Saturday night as part of a program of music by the siblings Mendelssohn. Soloist Irina Muresanu performed Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto receiving a standing ovation. Collapse

    • Article: At Faneuil Hall, music by the siblings Mendelssohn
      The Boston Globe - Apr 24, 2012
      By Music Critic Jeremy Eichler

      Depending on whom you ask, Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel (1805-47) may have been as musically gifted as her younger brother Felix. Direct comparisons are not possible because Fanny never pursued a public career in music, a fact often blamed on her brother… Expand

      Depending on whom you ask, Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel (1805-47) may have been as musically gifted as her younger brother Felix. Direct comparisons are not possible because Fanny never pursued a public career in music, a fact often blamed on her brother or her father, who famously wrote to her at age 15: “Music will perhaps become a profession for him [Felix], while for you it will and should always be only an ornament, never the foundation of your being and doing.”

      He was of course channeling the norms of the time, which saw no place for a wealthy woman in the vulgar domains of commerce and the professions. For her part, Fanny hardly let that stop her from building a rich life in music that pushed the boundaries of what was possible for women of the era. Specifically, she went on to compose prolifically, and to establish a fantastically successful musical salon in Berlin, where she played piano and conducted, often presenting her own works or those of her brother. Liszt and Gounod are known to have dropped by to listen. After her death, she was hailed in the press as “an artist in the most exalted sense of the word.”

      These days Fanny’s songs and chamber works occasionally turn up on programs but her sole orchestral work — an Overture in C major — is spotted far more rarely. It made an excellent choice as a curtain-raiser for the siblings Mendelssohn concert performed on Saturday night by the Boston Classical Orchestra. Written in her mid-20s, the piece, offered in a lively account here, shows deft craftsmanship, fresh ideas, and vital rhythmic energy, even if it gives only a hint of the symphonist she might have become. Collapse

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